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October 17, 2017

 

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America First Party of Mississippi
Responds to Rev. Donald Wildmon

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The Fight For Mississippi’s State Flag:
Why Good Men Must Stand Up Against the Lies
"Be not overcome of evil, but overcome evil with good"
        -- Romans 12:21

After surveying the forces arrayed against our State’s traditional Flag, one compelling question demands to be asked: are there no decent, prominent men left in this state who will stand up for the truth? Because so far, the fight seems to be dominated almost completely by lies and cowardice.

Our State Flag prominently displays the old Confederate Battle Flag, a St. Andrew’s Cross of blue, trimmed in white, and set with thirteen stars, all on a field of red. It honors patriots who fought and died for our state and its people.

But now, some insist that it be torn down as an offense to African Americans and the rest of the world.

The latest, and perhaps most disappointing, defection is that of the Reverend Dr. Donald Wildmon of Tupelo, who recently called upon all Mississippians to join him in voting against our State Flag.

The Reverend Dr. Wildmon acknowledges the smear that Flag opponents use whenever they paint the rest of us as “racists,” and he repudiates it. But he still believes that our Flag has “potentially offensive symbolism,” and that we must make everybody “feel wanted and equal,” even in “small things.”
 
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